Angle facts- getting the language right


Supplementary angles add up to 180 degrees and...

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How many times have you marked a GCSE paper which is a two-pointer where the question asks “find the size of angle x” and then “explain how you worked this out” to find that the pupil got the size of the angle correct but wrote an explanation that didn’t get the second mark? You kind of knew what they meant in their explanation, but the mark scheme was looking for “interior angles in parallel lines are supplementary” rather than “the angles next to the lines add up to 180”.

Here’s a very simple worksheet that I made to teach a lesson on using the correct language to describe angle facts. The idea is that you run through them with the pupils filling in the explanations on the worksheet which they can then use as a reference sheet when attempting questions later in the lesson.

I found a great way to start this lesson off is to ask the pupils to solve a typical angle fact question with an explanation of how they worked out the angle. The plenary is then exactly the same question followed by them comparing their answer at the end of the lesson with the answer they wrote in the starter to see how much they learned during the lesson.

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