Properties of quadrilaterals dominoes


Domino tiles

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There are some excellent resources on the TES website and Properties of Quadrilaterals Dominoes is one of them. Not much explanation needed; just match the shapes to their names and properties in a game of dominoes… The resource was created and published by the www.notjustsums.com website.

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Taboo words


Thanks to Sarah for this brilliant way to assess understanding of concepts and maths vocabulary.

Split the class up into groups of 4-6. Each group gets a set of small cards which each have on them one maths related word. The first thing they have to do is write on each card, under the math related word which is at the top, three words that people will not be allowed to use when describing the top word. For example, if the top word is circumference then three words the team could write underneath could be circle, perimeter and length. The idea is to make the describing of the top word as tricky as possible. The words that they can’t use when describing the top words are called Taboo words.

The sets of cards are then passed onto another group and one person in the group gets 1 minute to describe as many of the top words as possible to their group colleagues without using the taboo words. The teams get a point for each correct word they guess. Each team has a go and the scores added up at the end to identify the winning team. You can do a tie-breaker round if necessary.

There are lots of variations you could do of this game and it does seem to really engage the kids and is an excellent way to revise key vocabulary and assess conceptual knowledge.

Mexican Wave Sequences


A great little game to make sequences fun!

Get the pupils into a horseshoe. Put up an nth term rule on the board. They have to do a mexican wave around the horseshoe but as they stand up they have to shout out the next term in the sequence. The first person is n=1, second person is n=2 etc… See if they can get all the way around the horseshoe without making a mistake. If they do make a mistake they have to start again! Increase the complexity of the nth term rules as you go along!

A great game as it reinforces the idea that the common difference is the coefficient of the n term.

Sorry, I can’t remember who put forward this idea but it is brilliant. Thank you!

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Wanna be in my gang?


A great little game to get kids thinking about types of numbers.

Think of a particular type of numbers that you want the pupils to guess. This could be square numbers, cube numbers, triangle numbers, even numbers etc… Tell the pupils that they need to guess a number between 0 and 100. If their number matches your hidden criteria then you say “you’re in my gang”. If the number doesn’t match your hidden criteria then you say “you’re not in my gang”. The pupils keep guessing until they work out what type of numbers you are thinking of.

Big thanks to Nicola for this great idea.

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