Rotational symmetry- synchronised swimming


Further to our post “Symmetry the fun way: B-boy dancing“, Mr Williams suggested a great idea of using synchronised swimming as inspiration for a lesson about rotational symmetry.

Here is the Japanese Team in full flow at the Sydney Olympics:

There is an excellent routine at about 2 mins into the video which has some fantastic rotational symmetry in it. You could freeze frame the video here and use it to demonstrate the concept.

There are endless possibilities you could go on with from here: could they design their own synchronised swimming pattern/ routine and draw it or act it out on land, get them in the pool for a cross-curricular link if you have one or could they do some research for a homework to find as many pictures showing rotational symmetry in sports and other applications as they can? Great fun.

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Making 100


Pupils write out the digits 1 to 10 like this:

1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10

The aim is to create an expression that equals 100 by putting as many + – X and / signs between the digits as they like. You might like to demo one like this:

1    2   3 + 4   5   6  X 7 / 8 – 9 = 123 + 456 X 7 / 8 – 9 = 513

Obviously this one is too high but it does illustrate the method. You can decide whether the pupils must use BODMAS or not (I’d suggest they do!) and whether they are allowed to put brackets in as well.

There are many solutions and you might like to post them in the comments section below when you find them!

Thanks to Cat for this engaging little starter. It might make a brilliant homework too!

Have fun!

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Who is the best England batsman? An investigation using the mean, median, mode and range


Cricket isn’t everyone’s cup of tea but this lesson idea hasn’t failed to motivate any class that I have tried it on.

The idea is simple- look at the real world batting scores of England batsmen and use the mean, median, mode and range to decide who is the ‘best’ batsman. Each group of pupils are given these worksheets which list the scores, explains the task and also contain pictures that they might like to stick on a poster next to their statistical analysis and interpretive reasoning. Read more of this post

Height vs arm length- are they related?


Here’s a great little investigation into whether a person’s height and arm length are related. The pupils get a copy of this worksheet and have to use a metre stick to measure the height and arm length of ten of their class colleagues to the nearest cm. After recording their results in a table they draw a scatter graph and answer the questions at the bottom of the worksheet to think about whether there is a correlation. They could be encouraged to share their findings and justification with the class in a discussion in the plenary.

You’ll need metre rulers or tape measures and graph paper for this lesson in addition to the worksheets. Enjoy!

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