Angle facts- getting the language right


Supplementary angles add up to 180 degrees and...

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How many times have you marked a GCSE paper which is a two-pointer where the question asks “find the size of angle x” and then “explain how you worked this out” to find that the pupil got the size of the angle correct but wrote an explanation that didn’t get the second mark? You kind of knew what they meant in their explanation, but the mark scheme was looking for “interior angles in parallel lines are supplementary” rather than “the angles next to the lines add up to 180”.

Here’s a very simple worksheet that I made to teach a lesson on using the correct language to describe angle facts. The idea is that you run through them with the pupils filling in the explanations on the worksheet which they can then use as a reference sheet when attempting questions later in the lesson.

I found a great way to start this lesson off is to ask the pupils to solve a typical angle fact question with an explanation of how they worked out the angle. The plenary is then exactly the same question followed by them comparing their answer at the end of the lesson with the answer they wrote in the starter to see how much they learned during the lesson.

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Taboo words


Thanks to Sarah for this brilliant way to assess understanding of concepts and maths vocabulary.

Split the class up into groups of 4-6. Each group gets a set of small cards which each have on them one maths related word. The first thing they have to do is write on each card, under the math related word which is at the top, three words that people will not be allowed to use when describing the top word. For example, if the top word is circumference then three words the team could write underneath could be circle, perimeter and length. The idea is to make the describing of the top word as tricky as possible. The words that they can’t use when describing the top words are called Taboo words.

The sets of cards are then passed onto another group and one person in the group gets 1 minute to describe as many of the top words as possible to their group colleagues without using the taboo words. The teams get a point for each correct word they guess. Each team has a go and the scores added up at the end to identify the winning team. You can do a tie-breaker round if necessary.

There are lots of variations you could do of this game and it does seem to really engage the kids and is an excellent way to revise key vocabulary and assess conceptual knowledge.

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